The Great HPV Lie

Disturbing evidence on HPV from a country where most young women have received the vaccine. Action Alert!

A recent UK study looking at the clinical trials underlying the efficacy of the HPV vaccine found “significant uncertainties undermining claims of efficacy in [the] data.” This is the latest to come out about a vaccine that has been linked with many adverse events and negative health effects. We’ve also learned that, despite the high HPV vaccination rates in the UK, there has been a sharp rise in cervical cancer in the very age groups that first received the vaccine. These data highlight the need for state governments to halt the march towards vaccination mandates and for public health authorities to take the safety issues with this vaccine seriously.

The study authors analyzed twelve published Phase 2 and 3 efficacy trials in relation to the prevention of cervical cancer in women. They found several important problems with these trials. For one, the trial populations did not reflect the younger adolescent populations for which the vaccine is intended. The trials’ methodology also presented concerns. According to the authors, the methodologies used made it “impossible to determine effects on clinically significant outcomes. It is still uncertain whether human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination prevents cervical cancer as trials were not designed to detect this outcome.”

There’s more. Cancer Research UK has reported a striking 54% uptick in cervical cancer in 25-29 year-olds. This is the age group that would have first received the vaccine when the UK government launched its HPV vaccination program in 2008. The program was considered a success for achieving HPV vaccination rates of between 76 and 90 percent.

What explains high cervical cancer rates in a population that received the HPV vaccine? For one, we’ve seen evidence demonstrating that cancer risk increases by 44 percent with HPV vaccination if girls already have the HPV virus. An additional concern is that HPV vaccination seems to reduce HPV screening. HPV is one of the few cancers that can be prevented with regular screening. But Cancer UK notes that women seeking screening has reached a record low, which may be because those who have been vaccinated feel they are not at risk.

This should be the death knell of a vaccine that has already proven dangerous. In the past we covered a study showing that women aged 25-29 who received the HPV vaccine were less likely to get pregnant. Additionally, the US government’s vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS) lists a startling 57,287 adverse events from the HPV vaccine, including 419 deaths—far more than any other vaccine. A World Health Organization study demonstrated that the vaccination has a tendency to produce clusters of serious adverse events. The American College of Pediatricians raised concerns that the vaccine could be linked to premature ovarian failure. And let’s not forget the former Merck doctor who said that Gardasil “will become the greatest medical scandal of all time,” that it “serves no other purpose than to generate profit for the manufacturer,” and, like some other vaccines, that it can cause “Guillain-Barré syndrome, paralysis of the lower limbs, vaccine-induced MS, and vaccine-induced encephalitis.”

It is beyond irresponsible for the government and health authorities to continue to push this vaccine on young girls given the data and reliable alternative methods (such as regular screenings) that prevent cervical cancer.

If you have not already done so, please watch ANH’s full-length documentary on HPV Vaccines.

State-based action alerts! Check to see if your state is below and take action to prevent HPV mandates and other bills that restrict freedom of choice. Please send your message immediately. 

Arizona: HB 2050 would in effect eliminate the requirement that parents provide proof of vaccination unless there is an outbreak of a disease that a vaccine is recommended for. The bill states that “a school may not require a pupil to receive the recommended immunizations or refuse to admit or otherwise penalize a pupil because that pupil has not received the recommended immunizations.”

Colorado: SB 163 would restrict the religious and personal belief exemptions to vaccination.

Connecticut: HB 5044 would eliminate the religious belief exemption to vaccination for schools in the state.

Hawaii: HB 1182 would add a conscientious belief exemption to vaccines required for school.

Iowa: HF 206 would eliminate the religious belief exemption to vaccines required for school.

Illinois: SB 1669 and HB 4870 would mandate the HPV vaccine for some school students; SB 3668 removes the religious belief exemption, restricts the medical exemption, and allows minors to consent to vaccination.

Massachusetts: The Massachusetts legislature is considering a set of bills that would eliminate important exemptions to vaccinations (H3999/HD4284), mandate the HPV vaccine (S1264), and put the government in charge of medical exemptions (H4096/S2359).

Minnesota: The Minnesota legislature is considering a bill, SF 1520, that would eliminate the conscientious belief exemption to vaccination.

Missouri: HB 2380 would enact a conscientious belief exemption to vaccine requirements for public schools in Missouri and would remove private, parochial and parish schools from the current state laws governing vaccine requirements in Missouri.  

Mississippi: HB 1060 would add a religious belief exemption to schools and daycare facilities in the state.

New Jersey: The New Jersey legislature is considering a set of bills, A1603, S903, and A969/S902 that mandate the HPV vaccine for certain school children and restrict or eliminate the religious belief exemption, respectively. 

New York: The legislature is still considering additional bills that further restrict freedom of choice: S298B/A2912A (mandates HPV vaccine); A099 (allows forced vaccination under some circumstances); A2316 (mandates flu vaccine for daycare); A973 (allows HPV and Hep B vaccine without parental consent); S2276 (mandates flu vaccine for school and daycare); and A7838 (requires medical exemptions to be approved by the state health department).

The legislature is also considering S477 and A8676/S7202, which strengthen and expand the medical exemption to vaccination and add a religious belief exemption for school children, respectively.

Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania legislature is considering a set of bills (SB 626, SB 653, and HB 1771) that would restrict or eliminate the religious and philosophical exemptions to vaccination.

South Dakota: HB 1235 would eliminate all vaccine mandates for the State of South Dakota for public and non public schools, early childhood programs and post-secondary educational institutions.

Virginia: The Virginia legislature is considering a bill, HB 1090, that mandates the full ACIP recommended vaccine schedule for school in Virginia. That means the full recommended CDC schedule will be required for school children. Additionally, HB 1489 amends current state vaccine requirements to add HPV vaccines for boys.

Vermont: The legislature is considering a bill, H 238, that would eliminate the religious belief exemption to vaccination.

Washington: The Washington legislature is considering a bill, SB 5841, that would eliminate the personal belief and philosophical exemptions for all mandated vaccines.

Wisconsin: The legislature is considering a bill, A248/SB 262, that would eliminate the personal belief exemption to vaccination.

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